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Stock Car Racing Southwestern Ontario

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Windsor Ontario Horseracing History

Greatest Horse “Match Race” of All Time

Back in October 1920 one of the most anticipated and hotly contested horse races in the world took place at Kenilworth Race Track (Windsor Ontario). It was the first horse race ever filmed in its entirety, and had a purse of $75,000 (about $747,000 in 2008 dollars).

Public Domain Photo

Public Domain Photo

A match race between two of the most famous and successful horses of the time.

Sir Barton was owned by Commander J.K.L. Ross of Montreal.

 

 

 

Public Domain Photo

Public Domain Photo

Sir Barton was horse racing’s first triple crown winner, capturing the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and the Belmont Stakes in 1919.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Domain Photo

Public Domain Photo

Man o’ War was one of the most dominating and impressive horses of all time, Man o’ War is considered by many to be the greatest Thoroughbred racehorse of all time. In 21 career races, Man o’ War won 20 of them. The only one he lost was in 1919, was under dubious circumstances.

 

 

 

 

The race at Kenilworth Park was filmed. They had a capacity crowd. Reports at the time put attendance at more than 20,000.

The final start of Man o’ War’s career came in Windsor Ontario Canada in the Kenilworth Park Gold Cup (the first race to be filmed in its entirety). For this 1¼-mile match race, Man o’ War ran against Sir Barton but easily drew away in the first furlong and was slowed to win by seven lengths. Over his two-year career, Man o’ War won 20 of 21 races, setting three world records, two American records and three track records.

The Kenilworth Park Gold Cup was in actuality a “match race” between Sir Barton and Man o’ War. Another champion horse named Exterminator, was invited to compete in the race, since Canada did not allow match races. Due to the owners of the three not coming to a compromise on the conditions of the race, Exterminator was scratched, and in fact raced that same day on a different track.

Man O’ War – Only Loss

In the early 1900s, there were no starting gates. Horses circled around and then lined up behind a piece of webbing known as the barrier and were sent away when it was raised. In Man o’ War’s only loss, the Sanford Memorial Stakes, he was still circling with his back to the starting line when the barrier was raised (though some accounts give other reasons). After Man o’ War turned around, he already was far behind the starters. Jockey Johnny Loftus put Man o’ War in a bad position, getting boxed in by other horses. Despite this, he came close to winning, losing by a half-length.

 

You May Have Seen This Chain Letter

I Wrongly Perpetuated Incorrect Information

Yes, I wrongly perpetuated a chain email providing grossly inaccurate information and for that I apologize. I try to stick to authenticated facts and sometimes we get caught up in the moment and jump all over information about emotionally sensitive subjects.

The Complete Story As Explained by Those Who Know Their Facts

Have you heard rumours that refugees in Canada receive greater assistance from the government than pensioners?

For several years, a persistent chain email has been circulating claiming that refugees receive significantly more money in income assistance than Canadians collecting a pension.  The information, which is based on a letter published in the Toronto Star, is false.

Refugees come to Canada in different ways, but no matter the category, refugees receive very limited income assistance from the government.

The true picture is that: •Refugee claimants and refugees recognized by the Immigration and Refugee Board receive no special income assistance.  They may, depending on provincial regulations, be entitled, like other residents, to social assistance. •Privately sponsored refugees are not entitled to government assistance (including provincial assistance) during the period of their sponsorship (usually for one year after arrival in Canada).  Their income support must be provided by their sponsors. •Government assisted refugees have access to financial assistance from the federal government through the Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP).  This financial assistance is generally for one year maximum and is received only if they do not have their own financial resources or income.  The exact rate depends on the size of the family and is tied to social assistance rates.  In Ontario, for example, a single person receives $635 per month.  In addition, government-assisted refugees are entitled to a one-time set up allowance, to cover such things as clothes, basic household effects and installation of a phone.  For a single person there is a maximum allowance of $905.

Most resettled refugees arrive in Canada with a significant debt burden, since they are expected to repay the Canadian government for their transportation to Canada as well as the cost of their medical examination undertaken as part of their processing to come to Canada.  Refugee families therefore often begin life in Canada with a debt running to thousands of dollars.  Interest is charged on this loan at a rate set by the Department of Finance each year.

For more information on transportation loans for resettled refugees and the devastating impacts they have, see: http://www.ccrweb.ca/transportationloans.htm and http://www.ccrweb.ca/documents/loansEN.pdf

Have you received a chain email or read a letter to the editor spreading this false information? •‘Don’t believe everything you read in the paper…’ The same applies to the Internet!  •Think before you click –Sending on this email can have devastating impacts.  It spreads false rumours, hurting people who have already suffered in their home countries. Let’s offer them a better welcome to Canada than unfounded stigmas and prejudices.

How can you set the record straight? •Respond to the email with correct information and facts to the person who sent you this false information.  Give them the facts.  Ask them to send this information on to everyone that they sent the message to.  Here is a sample email message that you can use:

The information in this email is FALSE.

Passing it on can have devastating impacts.  It spreads false rumours, hurting people who have already suffered in their home countries. Let’s show them a better welcome to Canada than unfounded stigmas and prejudices.

Put yourself in the shoes of a refugee in Canada – the TRUE picture is that:

Refugees come to Canada in one of three ways: as refugee claimants, as privately sponsored refugees, or as government sponsored refugees.  No matter which of these three ways refugees comes to Canada, they are entitled to at most limited income assistance from the government. •Refugee claimants and refugees recognized by the Immigration and Refugee Board in Canada receive no specific income assistance.  Depending on the province, they may be entitled, like other residents, to social assistance. •Privately sponsored refugees are not entitled to government assistance (including provincial assistance) during the period of their sponsorship (usually for one year after arrival in Canada). •Government-assisted refugees may qualify for financial help only if they do not have their own financial resources or income and in most cases for one year maximum.  The exact rate depends on the size of the family and is tied to social assistance rates.  In Ontario, for example, a single person receives $635 per month.  Government-assisted refugees are allowed a one-time set up allowance for things like clothes, basic household good and telephone installation.  For a single person there is a one-time allowance up to a maximum of $905. •On top of a limited income, refugees sponsored by the government also arrive with a huge debt because they have to repay Canada for their travel costs.  Imagine arriving in Canada owing a debt greater than what you earned in your entire working life.  Many government-assisted refugees do just that and they must pay back the costs of their transportation to Canada, with interest.  For some families this can be as much as $10,000.  This is a huge burden for a refugee family that is starting fresh in a new country, with a new language to learn and few connections.  For more information, see: http://www.ccrweb.ca/transportationloans.htm

Please send this information back to anyone who has received this false information to set the record straight. For more information see the websites of the department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/faq/refugees/index.asp#support) and the Canadian Council for Refugees (http://www.ccrweb.ca/transportationloans.htm). •Post a response to this chain email on your website or in your blog, with the correct information. •If the rumour is circulating widely in your community, talk to journalists at your local radio station or community newspaper to produce a piece with the correct information.  Take the opportunity to raise the realities and challenges faced by refugees in your community.

Looking for more information?

Explanation of the origins of the email by Toronto Star ombudsperson (below)

You Asked For It, article published by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, Sept.-Oct. 2005, responding to the chain email PDF

Citizenship and Immigration Canada: True or False? Refugees receive more financial assistance from the federal government than Canadian pensioners.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada: Frequently Asked Questions about financial support to refugees

For details on income assistance entitlements, please consult the Citizenship and Immigration Canada manual, IP 3, part 2 on RAP available at http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/manuals/ip/index.asp

For a rebuttal of a US version of the myth, see Snopes.com (a site dedicated to getting the facts on urban legends)

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The Toronto Star ombudsperson published the following explanation of the origins of the email:

“Today’s rather sad and twisted tale began last March when the Star published a feature about plans to settle hundreds of African refugees in smaller Canadian cities. It was a simple story: Canada and the United Nations were flying asylum-seekers from a Somali refugee camp to new lives in centres such as Hamilton. As immigration/diversity reporter Nicholas Keung wrote, immigration officials hope to encourage (but not force) refugees to make new lives outside the magnet cities of Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. “We hope by relocating them all together and resettling them as a whole to the same community, we can create a positive environment to help them integrate into the Canadian society successfully,” an immigration official explained.

Fine and dandy. But halfway through the 1,500-word article, unforeseen trouble was lurking. In paragraph 16, the story said single refugees are eligible for $1,890 from Ottawa as a “start-up allowance, along with a $580 monthly social assistance, depending on how soon the person is able to find employment.” In addition, they get “a night lamp, a table, a chair and a single bed from the government,” the story said. In painful hindsight, those details could have been clearer. Actually, the $1,890 “start-up allowance” – including a $580 monthly social assistance cheque from Ottawa – was a one-time payment for basic household needs such as furnishings, pots and linens. The furniture is used. In quick order, two things happened after the article ran. First, a reader sent a nasty e-mail to the reporter. Among other things, it said charity begins at home and Canada should not “roll out the welcome mat” for refugees. The e-mailer assumed – erroneously – that the refugees would collect $2,470 a month. They’d be better off than Canadian pensioners.

More worrisome, the polemicist sent his rant to 100 recipients, some of whom likely spread the word to wider audiences. Ah, the wonders of the Internet! Alarmed by the e-mail, reporter Keung tried to contact the sender. It was too late. Having spread the misinformation, the e-mailer already had changed his address. At the same time, a second development occurred. The Star ran a letter to the editor that said the $2,470 “compares very well to a single pensioner who after contributing to the growth and development of Canada for 40 years can only receive a monthly maximum of $1,012 in old age pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement. “Maybe our pensioners should apply as refugees?” reasoned the writer.

Readers may not realize that fact checking of letters to the editor is nearly impossible at most daily papers, given limited staff resources and unforgiving deadlines. Although many mistakes are caught, the occasional doozer gets through. That was definitely the case here. Over the next several months, it became increasingly clear a disturbing urban myth had been born. Various offices at the Star have been getting e-mails from around the world, usually one or two a week. Many quote from the erroneous letter to the editor, expressing varying degrees of curiosity, dismay, envy or anger. “Let’s send this to all Canadians,” one e-mail roared, “so we can all be p—– off and maybe we can get the refugees cut back to $1,012 and the pensioners up to $2,470 and enjoy some of the money we were forced to submit to the government over the last 40 or 50 years.” In hindsight, the ombud now wishes he’d issued a speedy clarification to help set the record straight. But with information (and misinformation) moving at warp speed on the Internet, I doubt there was a silver bullet for the problem. Maybe this column can help dispel a damaging misperception about refugees and pensioners. Please tell your friends.”  (Toronto Star, Nov. 27, 2004.  Reproduced with permission – Torstar Syndication Services).

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One version of the email reads as follows:

Only in Canada.

Do not apply for your old age pension. Apply to be a refugee. It is interesting that the federal government provides a single refugee with a monthly allowance of $1,890.00 and each can get an additional $580.00 in social assistance for a total of $2,470.00.

This compares very well to a single pensioner who, after contributing to the growth and development of Canada for 40 or 50 years, can only receive a monthly maximum of $1,012.00 in old age pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement.

Maybe our pensioners should apply as refugees!

Let’s send this thought to as many Canadians as we can and maybe we can get the refugees cut back to $1,012.00 and the pensioners up to $2,470.00, so they can enjoy the money they were forced to submit to the Canadian government for those 40 to 50 years.

Please forward this to every Canadian you know.

Captan Sleeps On Owner’s Grave

dog-grave-sleepingThis message, which is moving around via social media posts, the blogosphere and email, tells the story of Capitán, a German Shepherd who has slept by his owner’s grave every night since the man died in 2006. According to the message Capitán disappeared from his home after his owner died but was later discovered by family members at the cemetery beside his owner’s grave. The message includes a photograph of a dog sleeping on a grave.

The story of Capitán is true, although the picture with the message does not depict Capitán, but rather another dog in another cemetery. A report about Capitán on the Dogheirs website notes:

For six years, a dog named Capitán has stayed by his owner’s graveside in Villa Carlos Paz Cordoba, Argentina. Every day at 6pm, he lays by Miguel Guzmán’s headstone, on faithful vigil.

The dog’s remarkable story of loyalty began on March 24, 2006, when Miguel, who was Capitán’s owner, passed away. As soon as Capitán realized Miguel was no longer at home, he left to search for him and miraculously managed to find Miguel’s grave in the nearby cemetery. Since then, the dog has stayed by his deceased owner’s side and refuses to return home.

Capitán is reportedly looked after by staff at the cemetery. Although he has returned to his previous home for visits, he always comes back to the cemetery to sleep by the grave of his owner.

The Real Captain

The Real Captain

This is certainly a remarkable story. But, what of the dog in the above picture? This dog is clearly not a German Shepherd and bears no resemblance to pictures of Capitán included in various news reports about him (see picture on left). And the cemetery shown in the news report photographs does not appear to be the same cemetery as the one shown in the above image. The origins of the above photograph are currently unclear.

 

 

 

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U.S. Republicans Make Ontario Liberals Look Like Amateurs

Why the U.S. Can’t Get a Budget Deal Done

Alan Simpson - Caricature

Alan Simpson – It Can Be Done (Photo credit: DonkeyHotey)

Wow – talk about Capone, Hoffa and the maffia! The Republican’s in the U.S. put them to shame when it comes to intimidation and control. If you want to be a member of the “inside club” and keep your powerful position, you better go with the flow and sign the oath real fast!

The “Good Old Boys Club” of the Republicans a new member better sign a vow to refuse to vote for any new tax on the rich boys. One prominent voice of the “Good Old Boys Club” states – “Republicans have always come around, even if it takes a little pressure.” HOLY CRAP!

When he hears about someone wavering on the pledge, he has a simple routine, he says. “Every time this happens, I call the guy and say: ‘I just want to make sure we’re on the same page. I don’t want to have an argument,’ ” he said. “But if you really want to raise taxes, I do want to have an argument.”

Grover Norquist is the man behind the GOP’s famous anti-tax pledge – the two decades-old pledge that, once signed, binds lawmakers (The Republican Good Old Boys) to a promise that they will never raise taxes.
 
The pledge has been signed by all but 16 of the incoming Republican members of the House of Representatives — and all but 12 of Republicans currently in Congress.

Is it any wonder that no progress can be made. The rich boys club is bound by an oath that sees them ostracized if they waiver on their promise.

 

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