Great Stories Archives

Kyle Busch’s NASCAR championship a comeback story for the ages

Get Used to Hearing it – Kyle Busch Sprint Cup Champion

Sporting News Said

Kyle Busch did more in 25 races than almost every other driver did in 36.

Kyle Busch Champion

Kyle Busch Champion

Busch won five races, second only to Joey Logano’s six. He finished with five wins, 12 top-five and 16 top-10 finishes in 25 races — championship numbers by any measure.

Shortly after returning from a severely broken leg, Busch went on one of the most amazing streaks in recent years, winning four of five races to not only make him eligible for the Chase, but prove emphatically that he belonged there.

The new Chase is all about winning races — that’s how you qualify for the Chase and earn a guaranteed spot. Busch met that qualification, and then some.

Once in the Chase, Busch raced smartly and consistently and did everything he had to do to make it to the championship race. Once there, he rose to the occasion, winning the season finale to capture the championship.

http://www.sportingnews.com/nascar-news/4661855-kyle-busch-wins-sprint-cup-championship-homestead-race-jeff-gordon-kevin-harvick

Kyle and Family

Kyle and Family

To people bitching that he did not run every race – There is no rule, and never has been a rule, that states you must run every race. The rule that was waived is.
” attempt to qualify for every race”. That was the rule that was waived due to medical issues!! Boohoo!! He is the 2015 Champion!!! Get used to hearing that!

 

Even Larry McReynolds Said Something Good About Kyle

To see what Kyle Busch did, to me is the comeback of 2015, not just in motorsports, but in all professional sports. For anyone to deny that Kyle should have been a championship contender, well honestly, I have nothing left to say to those people.

Tom Jensen of Foxsports says:

There have been many unbelievable stories throughout the history of NASCAR. Now the one of Kyle Busch’s comeback to win the 2015 Sprint Cup title can be added to the long list.

But then, Kyle came back and caught fire, winning four races in a 5 race stretch. Busch didn’t win again until the season-ending race at Homestead, but he ended the year with that race win and four straight top-five finishes to win his first Sprint Cup championship for himself, the first for Toyota and the fourth for JGR.

Even Kevin Harvick, last year’s champion and a man who has locked horns with Busch on occasion, was impressed.

USA Today
Kyle Busch’s NASCAR championship a comeback story for the ages

Making NASCAR’s Chase for the Sprint Cup? Unthinkable, as Busch figured to be out until at least July. Winning his first career title? The kind of comeback only Disney could imagine

But that’s exactly what happened Sunday at Homestead-Miami Speedway, with Busch pulling off another unlikely victory in the Ford EcoBoost 400 — his fifth of the season — to clinch his first career championship.

“He’s got that internal strength,” his brother, Kurt Busch, told USA TODAY Sports, his voice cracking. “That’s something my dad instilled in both of us.

The Best Car and Driver Won

The best car and driver outright beat them Sunday. He flat beat them all on the restart so he was the fastest. Phantom cautions happen all the time. He was going to win the championship without the caution.

I so much wish we would go back to the good old fashioned point sytem but it is what it is. Now somebody will win the Daytona 500 and be in the chase for next year immediately. That is bizarre.

Kyle Busch did more in 25 races than almost every other driver did in 36.

Busch won five races, second only to Joey Logano’s six. He finished with five wins, 12 top-five and 16 top-10 finishes in 25 races — championship numbers by any measure.

Shortly after returning from a severely broken leg, Busch went on one of the most amazing streaks in recent years, winning four of five races to not only make him eligible for the Chase, but prove emphatically that he belonged there.

The new Chase is all about winning races — that’s how you qualify for the Chase and earn a guaranteed spot. Busch met that qualification, and then some.

Once in the Chase, Busch raced smartly and consistently and did everything he had to do to make it to the championship race. Once there, he rose to the occasion, winning the season finale to capture the championship.

No asterisk* – get used to hearing it – Kyle Busch Sprint cup champion.

Championship weekend was a banner one for the 30-year-old Busch. In addition to his Sprint Cup championship, Kyle Busch Motorsports driver Erik Jones won the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series championship on Friday night and KBM won the owner’s championship in that series.

Celebration

Busch joined “The Dan Patrick Show” Monday morning to chat – from his airplane somewhere “over Washington, D.C.” nonetheless – about the celebration, which started for him about seven hours after the checkered flag fell.

Busch’s tour on Monday included appearances on ESPN SportsCenter, FS1 RaceHub, NASCAR America and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

On Tuesday, he will make appearances on FOX and Friends, Live! With Kelly and Michael, SiriusXM and at Facebook and ESPN.

Denny Hamlin to Kyle Busch: Way to ‘pound ’em in the ground’

When the 2015 Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup kicked off with a media event in downtown Chicago, defending champion Kevin Harvick indicated he had a simple plan for the red-hot Joe Gibbs Racing team.

“I think we’re going to pound them into the ground,” Harvick said of the JGR teams during the Chase-opening media event in Chicago. “That’s what I think. Hopefully, they can beat themselves.”

Being A Canadian Rule

Canadian flag outside the Maritime Museum of t...

Canadian flag outside the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic on September 4th, 2004 at approximately 16:43:08 (AST) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Simple rule for new comers to Canada – love it or leave it!

 

We got rules follow them or hit the road. It’s a privilege to be allowed to emigrate and to live in this country – not a right.    So many letter writers have explained how this land is made up of immigrants.  Maybe we should turn to our history books and point out to people why today’s Canadian should refuse to accept the new kind of immigrant any longer.

Back in 1900 when there was a rush from all areas of Europe to come to Canada, people had to get off a ship and stand in a long line in Halifax and be documented.  Some would even get down on their hands and knees and kiss the ground.  They made a pledge to uphold the laws and support their new country in good and bad times.  They made learning English a primary rule in their new Canadian households and some even changed their names to blend in with their new home.  They had waved good bye to their birth place to give their children a new and better life and did everything in their power to help their children assimilate into one culture.

Nothing was handed to them.  No free lunches, no welfare, no labour laws to protect them.  All they had were the skills, craftsmanship and desire they had brought with them to trade for a future of prosperity.

Most of their children came of age when World War II broke out.  Canadians fought alongside men whose parents had come straight over from Germany, Italy, France, Japan, China, Czechoslovakia, Russia, Sweden, Poland and so many other places.  None of these first generation Canadians ever gave any thought about what country their parents had come from.  They were Canadians fighting Hitler, Mussolini and the Emperor of Japan.  They were defending the Freedom as one people.  When we liberated France, no one in those villages was looking for the Ukrainian-Canadian or the German-Canadian or the Irish-Canadian.  The people of France saw only Canadians.

And we carried one flag that represented our country.  Not one of those immigrant sons would have thought about picking up another country’s flag and waving it to represent who they were.  It would have been a disgrace to their parents who had sacrificed so much to be here.  These immigrants truly knew what it meant to be a Canadian.  They stirred the melting pot into one red and white bowl.

And here we are in 2012 with a new kind of immigrant who wants the same rights and privileges, only they want to achieve it by playing with a different set of rules – one that includes a Canadian passport and a guarantee of being faithful to their mother country.  I’m sorry, that’s not what being a Canadian is all about.  Canadians have been very open-hearted and open-minded regarding immigrants, whether they were fleeing poverty, dictatorship, persecution, or what ever else makes us think of those aforementioned immigrants who truly did ADOPT our country, our flag, our morals and our customs, and left their wars, hatred, and divisions behind.  I believe that the immigrants who landed in Canada in the early 1900s deserve better than that for the toil, hard work and sacrifice of those legally searching for a better life.  I think they would be appalled that they are being used as an example by those waving foreign country flags, fighting foreign battles on our soil, making Canadians change to suit their religions and cultures, and wanting to change our country’s fabric by claiming discrimination when we do not give in to their demands.

Its about time we get real and stand up for our forefathers’ rights.  We are CANADIAN.  I am a Native of this Country and proud of it!

NO MORE POLITICAL CORRECTNESS

And while we’re on the subject – allow CHRISTMAS back in stores and our schools! I want back the country of my birth.

English Standards

Choose the Right Words Please

Choose the Right Words Please

This is a Hoot! – The Boss Not Happy With Proper English Issues!

Dear Colleagues
We must make sure we stick to the rules on how to describe people, because to stray from consistency causes confusion. The suspect in the Wikileaks case is an American soldier called Private Brad Manning. He is also known as Specialist Brad Manning. We should stick to the familiar, and refer to him at all times (until he is convicted of anything) as Pte Manning. We have started to call him Mr Manning; which, as he is not a civilian, is just plain wrong. The only exception is with officers (usually of the rank of Lt-General or above) who have also been knighted; in which case they should be called (for example) General Sir David Richards at first mention, and then may be either Gen Richards or Sir David. Many of our readers are or have been in the services and have great attention to detail on matters of rank. Since they know at once when we get it wrong, we need to have that attention to detail too.
If you find yourself using a word of whose meaning you are unsure, do look it up in the dictionary. When we get a word wrong it is embarrassing. It demeans us as professional writers and shakes our readers’ confidence in us. In recent weeks we have confused endocrinology – the study of the body’s endocrine system – with dendrochronology, which is the study of dating trees. More embarrassing still, we accused the eminent broadcaster Sir David Attenborough of being a naturist – someone who chooses not to wear clothes – when in fact he is a naturalist; and during a story about a coach crash in Paris the nationality of the driver changed from Austrian to Australian. Homogenous and homogeneous are not interchangeable and their respective meanings should be studied in the dictionary. Like embodied and embedded, which we also confused, effecting and affecting and eligibility and legibility, these pairs of words almost come under the heading of homophones, as do prostate and prostrate. We must take more care and ensure we are using the right word.
Homophones remain abundant and show up the writer and the newspaper or website. We are quality media, and quality media do not make mistakes such as these: “the luck of the drawer”, “through the kitchen sink”, “through up” “dragging their heals” and “slammed on the breaks”, all of which are clichés that might not be worthy of a piece of elegant writing even if spelt correctly. We have also confused Briton and Britain, hanger and hangar, hordes and hoards, peeled and pealed, lightening and lightning, stationery and stationary, principal and principle, peninsula and peninsular, licence and license and, in something of a pile-up, born, borne and bourn. If you are unsure of the meanings of any of these words, look them up before proceeding further.
Many of these mistakes are caused by carelessness and not properly reading back what one has written. We have had an increasing number of literals in recent weeks, both online and in the paper, which suggests the problem is getting worse rather than better. Heads of department have a particular responsibility to ensure that their staff perform to the best professional standards in this respect. We managed to perpetrate one of the worst literals of all recently – pubic for public- which may seem a laughing matter, but is not.
Some Americanisms keep slipping in, usually when we are given agency copy to re-write and do an inadequate job on it. There is no such verb as “impacted”, and other American-style usages of nouns as verbs should be avoided (authored, gifted etc). Maneuver is not spelt that way in Britain. We do not have lawmakers: we might just about have legislators, but better still we have parliament. People do not live in their hometown; they live in their home town, or even better the place where they were born.
Sometimes we do not properly think of the sense of what we are writing. There is a marked difference between the meanings of convince and persuade that is not recognised by some of you. If you are unsure of the distinction, look the words up. We wrote that “too many bomb disposal experts” had died in Afghanistan, which prompted an angry reader to ask what an acceptable number of dead experts would have been. We wrote of “an extraordinary killing spree” and were asked, in similar fashion, what would have constituted an ordinary one. We wrote about someone’s youngest child being her first, which was obviously not the case. Be careful too of the distinction between renting a property and letting it. And readers also asked us how there could, as we reported, be an 18-month long investigation into a crime that was committed only 14 months ago. We need to ensure that our facts, like our arithmetic, add up.
There have also been some grammatical difficulties. The style book (which, in case you have lost your copy, is also online) specifies the distinction between “compared with” and “compared to”, and it may be worth examining. One of our writers began a sentence with the phrase “us single ladies” which suggests we need to brush up on our pronouns. We should always write one in four is, not one in four are, since one is inevitably singular. Bacteria is plural. Put adverbs in a sentence where they make the most logical sense, if you have to use them at all. This will never be by splitting the infinitive, but to write “to go speedily to town” will always be preferable to “to go to town speedily”, or any other such variant. It is different from, not different to. Under age, like under way, should be written as two words.
Finally, may I mention some factual matters? Ottawa is the capital of Canada. Air Chief Marshal is spelt thus; and Mark Antony thus.
With best wishes
Simon Heffer
Associate Editor
The Daily Telegraph